Thursday, April 16, 2015

Better Business Bureau




I joined the Better Business Bureau a couple weeks ago and a plaque and some decals arrived this week.

I'm not sure if anyone in New Mexico has heard of the Better Business Bureau. In some parts of the country everyone has heard of it and the Better Business Bureau is in a nice building downtown. Here their office is in an anonymous looking little business park off Jefferson out near Paseo del Norte.

The Better Business Bureau promotes ethics in business. If you are listed with them it means they have checked you out and that you are who you say you are, that you have the proper permits and so forth. If someone files a complaint against you it will be listed on their web site.

In some parts of the country, if a consumer threatens to file a complaint with the BBB, it means something, and the business will try to rectify the customer's complaint to prevent a formal complaint being filed with the BBB.  There's a saying, in some parts of the country: "The customer is always right." People generally believe businesses adhere to that saying.





8 comments:

  1. It certainly meant something when I was much younger, 50 years ago. I had to search the web to see if Butte had a branch, and they do, though it's the first I've heard of or from them.

    I'm heading back to MT tomorrow after a month over here, don't want to overstay my welcome and all that.

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    1. Thanks for the comment SFM. See below.

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  2. Here as well it used to mean something. Now it seems to be a shadow. I suspect that the monopolization, globalization and arrogant cleverness of todays mega business world has long passed over such consumer organizations to do anything about anything. And thats my pessimistic comment today. I'm still waiting after 4 months for Bank of America to redeem the fake charges on my Visa Card

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    1. Thanks for the comment, TB. See below.

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  3. I appreciate someone remembering the BBB the same way I do, but it might not be the same as I remember it, either. I've done it before where I contrast where I am now with where I grew up, the 50s and 60s.

    After I left Michigan I was in the US Army, then lived in the South for ten years then for 20 kind of lived nowhere, spending it on the road in a semi truck then came here to the last remnant of the wild wild west, a world unto itself.

    I've asked my brother who still lives in New Buffalo what it's like there now but he sees it more in terms of the number of people who've moved into the area from Chicago and changed everything. Meanwhile he's become a dittohead and lives in a fantasy world where business owners are embodiments of the entrepreneurial spirit that made this the best country ever by god unless he's been thinking about Socialist Obama Democrats then it's in the crapper god bless 'murica.

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    1. Being a native New Mexican and having lived in NM, CO, ID, MT, MN, WI and MO it always seemed funny that the folks in the Midwest and points east had a strange fascination with the "west'. Everyone seemed to want to come "out west" and I finally figured out their fascination with cowboys and Indians and the wild west. I knew one guy from Delaware that within a year morphed from a metrosexual type of guy to a handle bar mustache, big hat with pants tucked into cowboy boots type of guy. Even took up chewing tobacco to add to the new persona. Now there are even "working ranches" doing a brisk business certifying cowboys, for a price.

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    2. Thanks for the comment, NM. Guilty as charged, but I'd add that the idea of the frontier, encompassing ideas about adventure, opportunity, wealth accumulation, making a fresh start, leaving behind old problems, inspired many Europeans, your ancestors included, to come to this continent in the first place, then inspired their children to just keep looking for more frontiers.

      "Go west young man," said Horace Greeley writing in New York in the 1850s. But somewhere along the way Hollywood co-opted "the west" and it's version of the west, which I think is actually based on a pulp fiction version before that, became the west. Someday I'm going to write a book, though, and call it "The First Cowboys Wore Sombreros."

      The Mission Revival type of architecture on the UMM campus, which they like to call "historic", perpetuates the pioneer fantasy in the minds of the people who fly in and out of here on jet airplanes and would need help pulling on their pointy toed cowboy boots. Still, there are the old mission churches, and there are authentic remnants of the Spanish colonies in places like Santa Fe. They adopted pueblo building techniques and put their style on it. And then there's Northern New Mexico, where real people are still using real buildings that real people, who didn't need no stinking architects, made with their own hands a long time ago.

      I never heard of "metrosexual." That's a great word!

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  4. Incidentally, the "We don't need no stinking badges," line from the John Huston movie Treasure of the Sierra Madre starring Humphrey Bogart, has become an internet meme and catchphrase to ironically portray Northern policies and attitudes about Mexico and in general Hispanics.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqomZQMZQCQ

    Bogart, who will soon be offed in the movie, is briefly seen here peering over a rock. That movie was part of the consciously racist and buffoonish portrayal of Mexico and Mexicans that began to work its way through US media immediately following the 1917 Socialist revolution in Mexico.

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