Friday, May 5, 2017

Protect Yourself From White Collar Crime







The New Inquiry has put together a delightful tool that tracks where white collar crime occurs and eventually will be able to predict where it occurs and by whom -- just like the computerized geographic modeling law enforcement uses for blue collar crime. An accompanying white paper tells how they do it.

At first take it's hard to imagine its usefulness and you might even think they're being tongue in cheek, but it's very serious, and it's usefulness lies primarily in that it gets you to think outside the constraints of your conditioning.

When we think of "crime" we usually think about the crimes the working class is arrested for and convicted of -- blue collar crime. We don't even include white collar crime in our considerations and that's deleterious in a number of ways. One, white collar crime is more costly to society and not just monetarily. For some of its caustic effects check out an insightful article by Glen Greenwald about what he calls elite immunity.

Our dual way of perceiving criminality -- where working class/blue collar crime is one thing and white collar/ruling class is something else-- also serves as a means of social control. When there are two sets of rules, when one class can move the goal posts around arbitrarily so that they're always the winners, we're on some level perpetually trying to gain but never obtaining upper class sanction. And think of the effects it's had on society to have vastly different penalties and consequences for, and law enforcement's prioritizing of, the two commonly used forms of cocaine -- powder, the choice of the ruling class, and crack, used mostly by the working class.

That New Media I'm Always Promoting Sometimes

The New Inquiry is one of a number of refreshing new publications that are filling the void created by the collapse of traditional information gatekeepers -- newspapers, journals, magazines, etc. -- by taking advantage of low cost web publishing and the lack of publishing opportunities for people who have something to say but can't get published, because of the collapse of traditional media, and who, in many cases never would have been published because their views, unlike everything that appears in the mainstream media, haven't received official pre-approval. Several of them are mentioned in a The Guardian article including another I've referred to, the Socialist online magazine Jacobin.






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